Tag Archives: acrylic

Kids Art Week – ‘Picasso Dog’ Rabbit

Who turns down free stuff? I don’t. So I was thrilled to be one of the “kids” in a free 6-day Kids Art Week class. You can sign up anytime and take it yourself. Be a kid again! Even better: Recruit a younger (or older) kid to do it with you!

Here is my ‘Picasso Dog’ from lesson #1. The wonderful Carla Sonheim steps you through it.

(click images to enlarge)

(5″ x 5″  acrylic on sketch paper)
Displayed artwork © 2015 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

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One More Table Top Class Piece

Tabletopclassblogbig2Diane Culhane’s painting technique involves layers and layers of overlapping color. She achieves a depth and richness that fascinates. And her compositions? Well, they’re fairytale’ish delights revealing new details each time you look. I could explore them for hours.

In class we practiced her method of overlapping semi-transparent acrylic glazes. Developing a painting this way is both magical and maddening. Too many layers and the wonderful mystery of the color build is lost. Problem is, you don’t know you’ve blown it until it’s too late. Here is my first experiment with this method. I felt kind of like the creepy doll perched precariously, below…

(click image to enlarge)




(8.5″ x  11″ acrylic and pen & ink on hot press paper)
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

4 x 4 Monoprinting

I simply HAD to paint with my gelli plate the other night. I chose a limited palette of 4 paints (black, white, burnt umber, and yellow-gold) and pulled only these 4 prints. My goal was simply to see how different or unified the prints would look.

Which arrangement do you prefer?

(click image each image to enlarge)

ganged_side-by-side

Side-by-side arrangement

ganged_stacked

Stacked arrangement





(8.5″ x 11″ each print, acrylic on index stock)
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Another Acrylic Experiment

Mixin’ it up: layered acrylic with alcohol, charcoal, and pen.

(click image to enlarge)
abstract_play_orange_poppyheads
(5.5″ x 9″ mostly acrylic on crescent board)
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Valentine’s Day Love

Hugs to all of you today!

(click image to enlarge)
valentine_love_wp
(4″ x 5″  mixed media on paper)
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Abstract Relief 3

I took Abstract Relief 1 and Abstract Relief 2‘s technique to a higher level here. Literally.

This composition is one of many ‘brain flashes’ — colorful visions that rush past my mind’s eye before I doze off to sleep. They ride in on a wave, one at a time, furiously, lasting a split second each. And like water, I can’t hold onto them. But, occasionally one will imprint itself and demand to be realized, like this one.

(click image to enlarge)
Abstract Relief 3
(10″ x 10″ acrylic and rice paper on birch panel)

The photos below show its surface relief. The reflective finish is spray varnish to seal the surface and provide UV protection.

(click image to enlarge)
Abstract Relief_surface
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Cobbles

You’ll see this again in a future post — likely with some creature added to the scene. This premature share is because I really like it in this stark state and wanted you to see it before I start tinkering.

This is a good example of how the gelli plate technique can provide a background scene on which to build.

(click image to enlarge)
rocks
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Blue Button

I could also title this “Red Tide.” Then what would the blue “button” become in the scene?

(click image to enlarge)
blue_button
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Gold Mounds

Are you tired of abstract monotypes yet? Not me!

(click image to enlarge)
gold_mounds
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Honu x 2

Honu is the Hawai’ian name for green sea turtle. These two side-by-side honu images  illustrate a primary and secondary “pull” from the gelli plate print process.

(left image) I make a stencil (the honu shape), place it over wet paint (the two blue areas) on the gelli plate, lay paper over it, press, and immediately pull off the printed paper to dry.

(right image) There remains some paint on the plate (and I hate wasting it!) so I continue adding additional layers to the “ghost” image, playing with textures and colors on a fresh piece of paper, and usually overwork it to death. An altogether different look—the wonder and fun of the gelli plate.

(click image to enlarge)
honu_duo
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.