Tag Archives: monotype

4 x 4 Monoprinting

I simply HAD to paint with my gelli plate the other night. I chose a limited palette of 4 paints (black, white, burnt umber, and yellow-gold) and pulled only these 4 prints. My goal was simply to see how different or unified the prints would look.

Which arrangement do you prefer?

(click image each image to enlarge)

ganged_side-by-side

Side-by-side arrangement

ganged_stacked

Stacked arrangement





(8.5″ x 11″ each print, acrylic on index stock)
Displayed artwork © 2014 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

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Cobbles

You’ll see this again in a future post — likely with some creature added to the scene. This premature share is because I really like it in this stark state and wanted you to see it before I start tinkering.

This is a good example of how the gelli plate technique can provide a background scene on which to build.

(click image to enlarge)
rocks
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Blue Button

I could also title this “Red Tide.” Then what would the blue “button” become in the scene?

(click image to enlarge)
blue_button
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Gold Mounds

Are you tired of abstract monotypes yet? Not me!

(click image to enlarge)
gold_mounds
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Honu x 2

Honu is the Hawai’ian name for green sea turtle. These two side-by-side honu images  illustrate a primary and secondary “pull” from the gelli plate print process.

(left image) I make a stencil (the honu shape), place it over wet paint (the two blue areas) on the gelli plate, lay paper over it, press, and immediately pull off the printed paper to dry.

(right image) There remains some paint on the plate (and I hate wasting it!) so I continue adding additional layers to the “ghost” image, playing with textures and colors on a fresh piece of paper, and usually overwork it to death. An altogether different look—the wonder and fun of the gelli plate.

(click image to enlarge)
honu_duo
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Squall

I considered cropping the upper white horizontal rectangle but a friend insisted that it remain. Your thoughts?

(click image to enlarge)
storm
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Lavafall

Your participation in yesterday’s call-for-a-title was stellar! Thank you all for sharing your visions. I think Pevaeva and Nannus rocked the boat with their suggested titles, (respectively) “Battle for the Yellow Sea,” and “Help Me Out!”

Okay, on to today’s…
Another gelli plate abstract — color layers and texture play.

(click image to enlarge)
lavafall
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Title Me…

I was going to name this “Wave.”
Then I saw things hatching out of eggs
And an upper-left Japanese-looking thingy.
Help me out,  a r t i c k l e  community.
What do you see in this gelli?
Title me (rotate as necessary for inspiration!).

(click image to enlarge)
waves
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Portuguese Rectangles

How’s this for a holiday palette? I spontaneously bought bright orange and green paint one day and decided I’d use them together in a gelli print.

portuguese_flag

The check-out guy asked if I was painting Portuguese flags! Maybe subliminally that’s why I chose rectangular shapes?


(click image to enlarge)

rectangles
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.

Mountain

A couple of weeks ago, I spent two evenings pulling prints from a Gelli plate. It’s a highly addictive tool whereby you really cannot predict or control the outcome. That’s what I find so fascinating. I’ll share several from my stack with you over the next week or so. I’ve named them based on what I see. But, I invite your comments, as you’ll undoubtedly interpret these differently. Thanks, in advance.

(click image to enlarge)
mountain
(8″ x 10″ acrylic monotype using Gelli plate)
Displayed artwork © 2013 Kim Reading. All rights reserved.